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 Categories : Agriculture Forestry & Arboriculture Vehicle Machinery and Plant

 

 

All Terrain vehicles – ATVs – are fantastic machines for agricultural and forestry use.   There are two categories of ATV:

Sit Astride ATV (Quads).   A motorised vehicle designed to travel on four low-pressure tyres on unpaved surfaces, with a seat designed to be straddled by the operator and with handlebars for steering.  These vehicles are intended to be used by a single operator without a passenger.

Sit in ATV (side-by-side ATVs).  Small utility vehicles in which the driver and passenger sit alongside each other in conventional seats or bench.   Most sit in vehicles are capable of carrying two occupants in this way.  The majority of sit in ATVs have four wheels although six wheels are also available.  Some vehicles are tracked instead of wheels.   Sometimes this type of ATV are referred to as utility vehicles (UTV) or rough terrain utility vehicles (RTV).

Whatever you are riding there are HAZARDS:

  • Being  thrown off during vehicle overturns or after loss of control.
  • Collision with  structures, trees, other vehicles etc.
  • Being  trapped/asphyxiated  under  an overturned machine.
  • Pedestrians  being struck or run over by ATV.

Some contributing factors and underlying causes of accidents and injury with ATVs :

  • Lack of formal operator training and/or experience.
  • Incorrect or lack of appropriate head protection.
  • Excessive speed
  • Age of operator
  • Carrying a passenger on a sit astride ATV
  • Unbalanced loads or overloading
  • Tipping on a bank, ditch, rut or bump
  • Loss of control on a steep slope combined with other factors e.g. ground or load condition.
  • Towing excessive loads with unbraked equipment.
  • Poor maintenance e.g.  faulty brakes, incorrect tyre pressures etc.

Newlands Training can offer all the training you will need and appropriate qualifications with Lantra Awards, NPORS or NPTC.    Check out the courses on the home page  

The HSE website has more information and advice   http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/ais33.pdf


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